JOURNEY TO THE TABLE is a new program ministry of The Upper Room specifically designed for young adults, ages 18 – 35 years old. It allows participants to explore faith through authentic teaching and it fosters open discussion through which participants can build relationships with a community of peers. Journey to the Table seeks to inspire and equip individuals to create spaces of Christian action in their homes, schools, places of work, and communities.

While Journey to the Table is in the test launch phase, follow the story below…

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Journey to the Table

I read a Tweet a couple days ago from Krista Tippett, the host of the radio show and podcast, On Being.

In a sense, I find this statement easy to understand and agree with: the people who I love most are also people that I know well. Because I know them well, it is easy to figure out what subjects to talk about, or which to leave for later. For me, there is also a challenge here: with the people I love most, why do I not broach certain subjects? Sometimes, it is a matter of timing. My fiancee and I had a miscommunication last weekend right before we walked into a store. We found everything we needed in the store, and later addressed that conversation again that evening. That was easy to address once we had a more focused time to do so. The challenge that this Tweet brought to my mind are all the other subjects that I choose to address later with the people I know best and love most. It can be difficult at times to have conversations in which we may disagree, or may not understand each other. It may even result in me having to re-think my opinion on a topic. How can I be better at practicing these kinds of conversations with the people I love most – with whom I have the safety to disagree and still love, to challenge one another and still have great respect? Maybe that would lead to more comfort in knowing what subjects I an broach even with people who are not inside that inner circle of people. How can I start those conversations with the same amount of respect and love for all people?
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Uncategorized
There are so many good pieces of information to unpack in these results. I find myself thinking about what my priorities were in my twenties, what they are now in my early thirties, and what my friends in different stage of life value most. In so doing, I am surprised at just how few places I have been able to talk about these things. What do you prioritize? In what space, and with what people do you get to talk about your priorities and theirs?
Millions of young educated Americans are heading into the workforce this summer, but unlike other generations, Millennials have higher expectations for their work and careers, but are simultaneously much less attached to their jobs, seeking meaning and identity elsewhere.
Source: Barna Group – Knowledge to navigate a changing world
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Research
Study results released in 2015 by the American Psychological Association show us that millennials may be the most stressed generation in America. It is more easily obvious that younger adults have higher amounts of stress. Much of this comes from predictable sources: money in a time of recession, becoming new parents and all the responsibility that goes along with that, etc. stress Another interesting question to address is how do we handle this stress? The report shows that younger adults are more likely to engage in sedentary activities to relieve stress. Is watching TV or listening to music something that can help? Would more active forms of self-care be more appropriate?
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Research
New research from Barna reveals growing concern about the moral condition of the nation, even as many American adults admit they are uncertain about how to determine right from wrong. So what do Americans believe? A majority of American adults across age group, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status and political ideology expresses concern about the nation’s moral condition—eight in 10 overall (80%). The proportion is closer to nine in 10 among Elders (89%) and Boomers (87%), while about three-quarters of Gen-Xers (75%) and Millennials (74%) report concern. According to the data most Americans, and especially millennials, think that knowing what is right or wrong is a matter of personal experience.  
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